June 25, 2018

#11609 Teaching with Poverty in Mind

Poverty does not mean a person is unable to learn and succeed. Children who live in poverty can meet high expectations and standards. It is the effective teacher who understands, builds relationships, seeks, resources, doesn’t allow for excuses, and creates high expectations for ALL that can bridge the gap for students of poverty.

This workshop will review the 5 effective factors that high achieving schools supporting poverty have in place as identified by Eric Jensen, author of “Teaching with Poverty in Mind”. Time will also be spent learning strategies that will help engage students of poverty in the learning process.
DATE:  July 25, 2018
Time:   9:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Location:  ROE Moline
Cost:  $125.00
Audience:  Teachers and Administrators
Presenters:  Dara Carr
Registration Deadline:  7/18, 2018

Statewide System of Support Foundational Services

ROEISC_Med (3)The Illinois State Board of Education has partnered with the Illinois Center for School Improvement, Regional Offices of Education and Intermediate Service Centers across the state to deliver high quality, coordinated and consistent professional development, technical assistance and networking which establish the Foundational Services delivery framework under the Statewide System of Support.

The seven areas include:

Continuous Improvement Planning (CIP), using Rising Star on the Illinois Interactive Report Card

    • The New Illinois Learning Standards incorporating the Common Core in ELA
    • The New Illinois Learning Standards incorporating the Common Core in mathematics
    • Balanced Assessment/PARCC
    • Teacher Evaluation
    • Family Engagement
    • The New Illinois Learning Standards incorporating Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

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BALANCED ASSESSMENT

 

ELA

#11617 Sharing Mindfulness with Families

During this session, participants will learn how to share mindful practices with families through family yoga events that include yoga stories and family yoga games. Participants will also be provided with parent education and communication tools, as well as FREE resources regarding mindful parenting. We will also learn techniques that can be shared between families and the classroom! This session will be most applicable to teachers serving families with children pre-school through Grade 5. Join Us!

Date: June 26, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

Location: ROE Moline

Cost: FREE

Hours: 4

Presenter:   Lindsay Meeker

Audience:   Prek – 5th grade Teachers & Administrators

Registration Deadline: 6/19/2018

 

 

FINE ARTS

 

 


 FOLLOWING THE NEW LAWS

 

 

 

FOUNDATIONAL SERVICES TEACHER EVALUATION

 

 

 

 

MATH

 

 

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

 

 

 

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SCIENCE

 

 

 

 

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SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

TRAUMA

#11651 How we became a Trauma-Informed School – Putting the Trauma Informed Pieces Together: School Wide System & Classroom Strategies

FOUNDATIONAL SERVICES FOR ALL 2.0

Who: Teachers, Administrators, School Social workers, counselors, psychologists, paras, nurses, teams and other disciplinarians

When: June 28, 2018        9:30 AM – 3:00 PM    Reg. Deadline:  6/21/2018

Where: ROE Moline          Cost:      $25.00                              PD Hours:  5

Presenters:  Matt Lingafelter, Galesburg #205 Administrator and Andrea Frieden, Galesburg #205 Teache

Outcomes and Description:

Our speakers are both educator-leaders from the Galesburg #205 School District. Matt Lingafelter has worked as an upper elementary teacher, outreach worker, and Galesburg #205 administrator. Andrea Frieden has worked as a primary classroom teacher, as well as a school-wide interventionist.  They take pride in the transformational work their regular education school as undergone in the area of implementing trauma-informed practices over the last 4 years.  They are passionate about sharing this foundational knowledge with you.

 

The day will be divided into 2 Focus Areas.   Focus Area #1 concerns, “Establishing a Trauma-Informed System with School-wide Commitment.” High performing schools have systems in place that lead them to achieve their goals.  The needs of students from trauma require a systematic approach rather than simply adding a program.  During the day, we will focus on how to respond to the social-emotional and behavioral needs of students.  When implemented successfully, you will find your school has gone through a paradigm shift related to meeting the needs of each and every student.

 

Focus #2 concerns, “Classroom Strategies that Build a Community for Student Success.” Building a climate of connectedness and safety is essential to a classroom community.   Fortunately, there are many strategies and structures that can easily be implemented within a classroom.  These strategies and structures will also help to preserve the relationships and climate of safety in the classroom even when a student becomes dysregulated.



 

#11649 Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) INTERFACE: ACES PART I:

Understanding the impact of trauma on health, behavior and your role in building resiliency for positive students outcomes

FOUNDATIONAL SERVICES FOR ALL 2.0

Who: All Teachers, Administrators, school social workers, counselors, psychologists, para-educators, nurses, and other professionals working with students & community

When: July 23, 2018   @ 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM Register by July 13, 2018

Where: ROE Moline          Lunch will be provided

Cost:       $25.00                               PD Hours:  6

Presenters: Anne McNelis, LCSW of Transitions Mental Health

THIS WORKSHOP IS REQUIRED TO ATTEND JULY 24, ACES COMES TO SCHOOL

Outcomes and Description:

If you work with children, learning about ACEs will change the way you deal with those difficult behaviors some children exhibit. The information in this workshop is a prerequisite to understanding the strategies presented on July 24th at the “ACES Comes to School: Strategies to Reduce Challenging Behaviors” workshop.

The ACE (adverse childhood experiences) study confirms with scientific evidence that adversity during development increases the risk of physical, mental and behavioral problems later in life. The ACE Study and other research using the Study’s framework have taught us that ACEs are the leading cause of health and social problems in our nation – the most powerful determinant of the public’s health. Toxic stress during childhood can impact brain development and brain interaction with body systems and can result in negative behaviors. You see these behaviors and maladaptive coping skills every day in classrooms, hallways, and on the sidewalk. But childhood is a window of opportunity for building resilience – after all, the developing brain is sensitive to all kinds of experience. Learn about these patterns of brain development, the ACE study, our opportunities for ACE prevention, and how protective systems promote resilience in children, families and our community for more productive learning and safe, nurturing environments.

This training will include a viewing and discussion of the documentary “Paper Tigers”. “Paper

Tigers” follows a year in the life of an alternative high school that has radically changed its approach to disciplining its students, becoming a promising model for how to break the cycles of poverty, violence and disease that affect families.

Training provided by Anne McNelis, LCSW of Transitions Mental Health Services.

Training supported and endorsed by the Eastern Iowa – Western Illinois Trauma Informed Care Consortium.


#11650 Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) Comes to School:

Strategies to Reduce Challenging Symptoms in the School

FOUNDATIONAL SERVICES FOR ALL 2.0

 

Who: All Teachers, Administrators, school social workers, counselors, psychologists, para-educators, nurses, and other professionals working with students & community

When: July 24, 2018  9:00 AM – 3:30 PM         Register by July 13, 2018

Where: ROE Moline          Lunch will be provided

Cost:       $25.00                               PD Hours:  6

Presenters: Jennifer Best, MS Ed., CFLE, CFCS-HDFS, BCC

Outcomes and Description:

Attendance at the July 23 ROE workshop or similar ACES Interface Workshop is required to attend this workshop. When students have been exposed to traumatic events and situations, their neurodevelopment is altered in ways that impact their behavior, executive functioning and academic performance in school. These students often become our most challenging to serve and support. Building on the information in the ACE Interface training, this session will delve deeper into the neuro-psycho-social impact of trauma, and how these symptoms are exhibited in the classroom. Then, participants will explore a three-tiered approach for reducing symptoms and supporting healthy development. This approach will include practical tools for preventing traumatic symptoms through environmental and academic strategies, as well as evidence-based approaches to handling our own stress in order to make better connections with students who need it most. Taught by Jennifer Best, MS Ed., CFLE, CFCS-HDFS, BCC from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, participants will walk away with books, materials and hands-on tools that they can start implementing the day after the training.

Training supported and endorsed by the Eastern Iowa – Western Illinois Trauma Informed Care Consortium.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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